photographers

AIBP - Creating a Sense of Community - Membership Has Its Privileges

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As some of you may or may not know, I belong to an esteemed group of Boudoir Photographers. Collectively, we are known as the Association of International Boudoir Photographers (AIBP). Erin Zahradka, founded the organization in 2009 along with the help of Cate Scaglione, Jennifer Tallerico and Jesus Bernardo the AIBP community was born.

 We proudly boast having members who hail from 6 continents around the globe. We are 676 members strong and constantly growing. Our message and mission is clear and centers on the empowerment of women through photography.   Additionally, our focus is to elevate the standards of boudoir photography through education and connections in order to enhance the experience of our clients.

Not only do we set the highest professional standard when it comes to boudoir photography but we also raise the bar for the boudoir-photography industry. The sense of community that has been created over the years since the group was founded is just incredible to me. It feels like a family where we can all rely on one another, reach out to one another and get the support that is needed whenever it is needed and that doesn’t just go as far as photography needs. The members of the group are always willing to help out its members should a member be in need for a personal matter as well. We are there for each other plain and simple and it’s such a wonderful community to be a part of.

This is not just a collection of hobbyist or enthusiast photographers. It is a group of working professional, knowledgeable and talented boudoir photographers from around the world.

I should add…we aren’t ALL WORK and no play! There are weekly contests, workshops, retreats and mentorship programs. Hell we even have our own magazine, Philsophie, which provides opportunities for members of the group to submit their work for publication. There are shooting tips, daily discussions around boudoir photography and we are constantly striving to get the boudoir photography industry the recognition this niche of so rightly deserves.

I have been a member of AIBP for 3 years now and this is one of the best organizations I have ever been involved with. It’s not just a FB group, or an online community. It truly is a community where lifelong friendships are forged and a sense of family created. It’s inclusive, helpful, encouraging and a place I feel welcome. I honestly cannot even count the amount of times this collective of amazing photographers AND people have helped me out. If you as a photographer are reading this blog post right now and perhaps on the fence about joining the group, DO NOT even give it a second thought, JOIN TODAY! I promise you will NOT be disappointed. The AIBP community’s value is far beyond measure. Special thank you Erin Zahradka and ALL the AIBP Members for EVERYTHING you do EVERY DAY!

The Big Announcement Part I

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Owning a business is a lot of hard work and nobody ever said it would be easy. It’s a roller coaster ride of many ups and downs. I truly do believe if you are willing to put in the hard work, the long hours and do things right, you will definitely reap the benefits of being a full time entrepreneur.

I know in my business of photography there is an amazing community of photographers which most of them are more than willing to share “trade secrets” so to speak lending a helping hand when asked with no hesitation. One of the many wonderful and amazingly talented people I have had the pleasure of knowing and receiving help from is Crystal Mitchell from Provocateur by Crystal Mitchell. She is an incredible human being, entrepreneur, and photographer.

This has been a long time coming and has taken a lot of work in a very short period of time to actually bring it to fruition. I have to say though, seeing the hard work put in literally materialize as results you can physically see, is beyond satisfying for me. I am so proud of what I have accomplished in this short time with my business.

So I am sure you are all curious as to what this BIG announcement I have been speaking of is..... well It isn’t just one thing, there are multiple things I have been working on that have culminated in this BIG announcement.

So I would like to formally welcome you to the new Visuphoria Website! A sleek clean feel for our everyday women to feel comfortable viewing. We have also enlisted some top Album manufacturers, and lower session fees! This makes it affordable for everyone to come in and have their own session with the team of Visuphoria.

Is a Photograph Made or Taken?

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In the words of the amazing Ansel Adams... “You don’t take a photograph, you make it”.  I truly do not believe that just anyone can make a photograph.

Just the language used in that phrase right there seems to be a big topic of discussion among photographers. There are some from each school of thought. Some would say that “anybody” can take a photograph and others seem to be of the mind that a photograph is “made”.

Perhaps, depending on the moment or instance, some are made and some are taken. When I think of a photograph being taken, it makes me think of a snapshot or a cell phone shot. That’s just me though. I think as professional photographers, we “make” photographs.

When talking about making a photograph, there are so many factors that go into the “making” a photograph.  It’s more in depth, things like: thought, time of day, subject, camera settings, composition, post production (and perhaps one of THE MOST important things) LIGHT and LIGHTING.  All of these things go into making a photograph. It is all about the photographer’s vision and that’s where it all starts, with the vision!

Regardless of how you view it or think of it, I guess it is up to the individual to interpret their idea/thought on the subject of taking or making a photograph. I was just curious as to people’s thoughts and take on it so I thought I would write it down to perhaps spark a conversation.

Put Your Money Where Your Mouth is... In Front of the Camera

 

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I can honestly say I really don’t like having my picture taken and I am sure there are quite a few photographers out there who would agree with this sentiment. I know it sounds strange, a photographer who doesn’t like being on the other side of the camera?!

For me, I am most comfortable BEHIIND the camera; I don’t like that feeling of feeling vulnerable and awkward. I don’t know how to pose or genuinely smile without having it come off looking fake.

I have been thinking about this quite a bit lately and the more I think about it, the more I see clearly that it’s quite hypocritical of me as a photographer to take that stance on getting in front of the camera. How can I possibly expect my clients to relax and feel comfortable in front of the camera if I don’t do it myself? A practice what you preach moment, if you will. 

Perhaps it’s even a little bit more hypocritical for me being a boudoir photographer.  I have women who are complete strangers, wearing very little clothing getting in front of my camera. I pose and light them for photographs.  I talk them through the photo session. I try to help them feel relaxed and forget they are in front of a camera to make it a little less of an intimidating experience.

Now more than ever I think we male photographers need to step into our clients shoes and get in FRONT of the camera.  Maybe have a female photographer shoot us in a “dudoir” session.  You know, put my money where my mouth is!  I have noticed a trend online over the past while that more men are doing exactly that and I think it’s amazing. It doesn’t have to be cheesy just because I am a male.  It can be done very tastefully. All the images I have seen from male boudoir (dudoir) shoots were very well done.

We need to do this in order to feel and understand the vulnerability and nervousness our clients feel when they step in front of our cameras so we can HONESTLY relate and genuinely say we know how they feel.

I am challenging all my male counterparts in the industry to do exactly this! Including me! I am looking for a female photographer that is up for the task of photographing this mug of mine!  Any takers????

Putting Yourself Out There - Showing Your Work

For me this was one of my biggest struggles when I was first starting out as a photographer and believe me it was an ongoing inner battle, I was nervous!  What will other people think of my work? Will they say it sucks? Will they like it?

I was THAT guy who would only show my work to friends and family and of course the feedback was always good, which in hindsight was more of a hindrance than help when I look back on it now.  Showing your work to your family and friends is one thing, they are not going to tell you your work sucks are they? They are going to say the things they think you want to hear which doesn’t benefit you in any way, shape or form.

It’s very tough to put yourself out there, seemingly on display and sharing your work with a bunch of strangers. You feel vulnerable, naked and alone!  After all, this is something you created from scratch you put your heart and soul into this. Everybody is a critic, everyone has something to say. It takes a lot of courage. You are worried about being judged, what will everyone say about you’re work, I get it! You are going to get deflated and knocked down but you just have to pick yourself up, dust yourself off and grab your camera and make more photographs.

You have to reach way down within and find the courage to get your work seen.  Get as many eyes on it as possible!  That way you find out what you need to work on and know which areas you need to improve.  There will always be areas you can improve on even after years of being a photographer and just as in regular life you are NEVER EVER finished learning.

One of my past photography teachers reached out to me recently and we were talking and he said: “…as artists, we thrive on encouragement. It's like the tide, when it's in it feels good and when it’s out, it can be damn lonely!” His words rang in my head for days afterwards. This really struck a chord in me and if you are reading this right now, you know who you are. Thank you for all your words of encouragement as of late, they mean a lot to me.

So people don’t give up!  Keep consistently putting your work out there. Yes, it is definitely not an easy thing to do but it IS necessary!

 

Photo courtesy of Linda Langerak

Male Boudoir Photographers - It's NOT a Man's World

Now I am fairly new to boudoir photography and when I say new I mean I have done a handful of shoots.  I know there are lots of guys out there who aren’t photographers at all but think wow that is so cool and what a great gig that would be. Believe me I have even heard that from a few friends. You get to photograph half naked women in lingerie, look at sexy women all day and so on. While yes this is true I photograph women in lingerie this is not what it’s all about for me, not at all!

When I am shooting a session I am not even thinking about how sexy the woman is or anything like that because I am too busy focusing on posing her.  I am making sure the lighting works for the shot and ensuring my camera settings are correct in order to make certain I get the shot as close to perfect “in camera” as possible. I really don’t have time to be concerned about the other stuff especially when I am in the zone shooting, interacting with my subject.

I know that some people would balk at that and say I am bullshitting and it must be at least part of the intrigue and interest but it really isn’t. In all honesty for me it is truly about making the women who get in front of my camera feel comfortable in their own skin.  Feel beautiful, help them build their confidence, help them love their bodies.  Ultimately I want them to be happy with the images/art I create for them and if I can do that for EVERY woman that gets in front of my camera then I know I have done my job as a photographer.  I will have helped another person to realize their self-worth and beauty and that my friends is the icing on the proverbial cake!

Yervant and Anie - The Photography Symposium 2016

“All good things must come to an end” and no better way to sum up the second day of Yervant and Anie’s Photography Symposium. This event rolled through Toronto as one of its many stops on June 15th, 16th and 17th.  I attended the event for 2 days and there was a master class on the third day which I opted out of.

It was an incredible experience and one I won’t soon forget. If you do get the chance to attend this event in your city, I strongly advise you do check it out, you won't be disappointed. Yervant and Anie put together an unbelievable program packed with a wealth of information, knowledge and not to mention an incredible line up of 6 industry professionals all experts in their particular area of photography. It took place at The Berkley Field House, a truly beautiful venue. It was geared at a smaller more intimate group of about 60-100 attendees which I feel was the perfect amount.

The two days were jam packed with information and personal stories and at times, astonishingly emotional and honest moments.  Yervant speaking about wedding photography and making us laugh hysterically.  Joe Buissink sharing his incredibly moving story of his childhood and why he is so passionate about wedding photography.  Sue Bryce sharing her brilliance on posing your subjects.  Michele Neal Celentano and her insistence on existing in your photographs because of her beautifully moving story.

There were a couple of common threads that were strung through these two days of presentations and stories. These recurring threads seemed to be:  if you work hard at your craft, you can achieve whatever it is you want for you and your business and you are worth it so charge your clients what you feel you are worth but keep in mind, you must deliver on that promise.

One thing in particular really struck a chord with me, the presenters kept re-iterating was with regards to printing your work.  Then I thought about it and we don’t print our work nearly as often as we should! You MUST print your work.  Preserve those moments in time through print as you never get a second chance to go back and relive those moments.  They are fleeting!

Remember, it’s not a photograph until it’s printed!  This statement really reverberated me and reminded me just how important it is for us photographers to print our work. Not only are you helping yourself but you are also helping to preserve our industry.

Workshops - Learning, Sharing, Shooting

When considering whether or not to attend a workshop, a lot of factors contribute to the ultimate decision of attending. They are a great way to expand your network as there will undoubtedly be other like-minded people to speak with, to share knowledge with and of course the obvious, to learn! Do I? or Don’t I? Of course the first one is cost followed by content followed by a series of questions: How will it benefit me? How long is the workshop? and who is giving the workshop?
When the Peter Hurley “Illuminating the Face” workshop was announced for Toronto, well that was a no brainer! I knew I had to attend as I had been waiting some time for this one to come to town. It took place back in March and this was an incredible opportunity to learn from the best in the industry. How could I possibly pass that up!? I figured I wasn’t going to get many chances to actually get to interact, to learn from him. I had to take advantage of being up close and personal with the one and only Peter Hurley. I found the cost to be incredibly reasonable. The location was right here in Toronto, so getting there was easy. The time commitment was only an 8 hour day. This was without a doubt something I had to do.
The workshop was put on by Henry’s Camera and they did an incredible job. I would like to say a huge thanks to them for putting this on. The workshop was also sponsored by Profoto and I have to say their gear is absolutely incredible, so easy to use and easy to work with. Their reps were so friendly and helpful.
It was an absolutely incredible day all around. It was a full, jam packed eight hour day where I got to learn from the master of headshots. I got to meet a ton of great people. Perhaps some of the nicest people I have ever met. Peter Hurley was such an incredible teacher. So easy to talk to, down to earth and just an all-around incredibly nice guy. It was such an invaluable experience I will never forget.

Print Portfolios - How Important Are They?

In today’s world where ease of access, instant gratification and convenience are king, it’s very easy to get caught up and even lost in the digital world. I have been asked many times: “Do you have an online presence?”, “Do you have a portfolio we can look at online?” Yes I do have a website not unlike most people in our business do and I have some work in other places that could be considered a portfolio. Normally when I get asked these questions, it is usually by people who are looking to see a sample of my work in order to jury it to make a decision for a show or a magazine submission. Now in this type of situation it makes perfect sense because it’s quick and incredibly convenient. This is usually the way I roll when it comes to portfolios. A printed portfolio was always more, maybe I should put one together one day. I never really gave it much weight that is until very recently.
A few weeks ago I was having a conversation with a friend of mine and he asked me if I had ever given any thought to trying to get my art into some corporate spaces. To be honest, the thought had crossed my mind previously but just as fast as it entered, it was gone again. He told me I should give it some serious thought because he had a place in mind for my work. He just so happened to have some high level contacts and said he would be happy to send along an email to attempt to facilitate a meeting for me. Well that was all I needed to hear and I thought why not! Nothing ventured, nothing gained! I immediately told him YES! Let’s see what happens.
The very next day I was copied on an email from my friend to an Executive explaining how he knew a photographer whose work he thought would fit in well in their workplace. Three days later, I received an email with a request for a meeting to show him my portfolio. I was ecstatic, over the moon excited and a bundle of nerves all at once. I knew I had but this one opportunity to rock this meeting and really make it count so everything had to be perfect! I was only going to get one shot at making an impression so I had to ensure I left one hell of a good one! Right away the thought came to me! I have to present a printed portfolio for this one. I replied back with a date which was a couple of weeks away which would afford me the time needed to get this whole thing put together.
That night I went home and immediately got to work on selecting my images - which ended up initially being nineteen but got whittled down to a final ten - which I would send off to be printed. Fast forward a week and there I was with these images in my hands. Wow, what a very different feeling. Actually having the tactile feel of physical images in my hands. It took me back to my film and darkroom days. I immediately went to work placing them into my brand new portfolio book. When I was finished, I stood there and looked at the images this way and I felt proud in that moment to have something like this in my hands that I could call “MY” portfolio.
In my opinion, a printed portfolio goes a long way and speaks volumes. It shows you take pride in your work and care to take that extra step to ensure you leave a lasting impression. Not every situation calls for this type of investment but at some point you will encounter it in your career and I strongly urge you to follow through and make the investment in print, you will be glad you did!

The Importance of Printing Your Work - Preserving Memories

As photographers, printing our work is or at least should be a big part of what we do for ourselves AND of course our clients. In my humble opinion, preserving in print the work we create is a necessity. Photographs are meant to be seen on paper not on a screen. Remember the days of film photography? That is all we had. Shoot your images on film. Take that film into the darkroom and watch your images come to life on a piece of photo paper right in front of your eyes. It was like magic! If you didn’t have access to a dark room, you would just drop your images off at the lab to be processed then headed back in a few days to pick up your images. The excitement you felt when opening up that envelope that contained your images…ohhh the anticipation and excitement! It was a tangible thing. You could touch it, feel it AND look at it. There is something almost romantic about a printed image. You just can’t quite recreate that film look when you are shooting digitally. One could say printing emancipates your photographs!
Nowadays we just take the memory card out of our cameras, slide it into the slot on our computers and start browsing the images in the program of our choice for viewing/editing. You can just edit your images in a program on the computer, export it, attach it to an email and send it off to whomever you want. You can also share your image with hundreds/thousands of others by simply throwing that digital file onto the Internet and instantly have an audience. Digital photography is incredibly convenient for sure but it’s not the same.
There is still something to be said for physically holding in your hands a moment captured in time that was printed on photo paper. To be able to see something you created hanging on a wall framed and in print...you just can’t beat that feeling it gives you. To be able to stand back and admire that gives you an indescribable feeling.

Spreading My Wings - Trying New Things

Anyone who knows my style of photography or about the genre of photography I typically shoot, you know I am an urban exploration shooter. This is my passion and my love. I know photographers can make money at this by selling prints of their work but let’s be honest, how many urbex shooters do you know make a living selling their artwork? By no means am I saying this is impossible to do however let’s say it’s not commonplace.
Over the past year I have been thinking about how I can branch out. Ideas swimming around in my head. Personal projects I want to work on but mainly I wonder, how can I start making some real money at this? I have settled upon doing portraiture and headshots. It seemed very fitting seeing as I am currently the headshot photographer at my full time job. It was a no brainer. I truly enjoy the interaction with the client while shooting. Dealing with people and photographing them. Bringing out the best I can in them.
Recently I have found inspiration in watching some training videos on mastering the perfect headshot as well as other educational videos on different methods and styles of shooting headshots. One in particular by a photographer whose work I really admire, Peter Hurley. He has inspired me! I just love to watch him work and learn from him. He is a master at his craft and seems incredibly down to earth and to be honest, a very cool guy. Seeing as I don’t have a half decent headshot myself it would be a thrill to meet him and have him take my headshot. Seems pretty strange for a photographer not to have a really great headshot, I know.
Watching his videos has inspired me to not only branch out and try a new avenue to generate revenue but to experiment and pursue a new method of lighting to incorporate into my headshots. I gave this method a shot a couple of weeks ago for a friend of mine who is a real estate agent here in the Toronto area and I must say I am quite pleased with how they turned out. I know he is happy with the end results as well. Spreading your wings and branching out and trying new things can be very scary at times but the risk can be well worth the reward. I know I still have to practice and work on my technique but I am excited about this new journey I am embarking on in the photography world and I look forward to learning and developing my style as a headshot photographer.

Beauty and Editing Practices in Photography

In keeping with a similar theme to my last blog post I want to touch on a subject in this one that seems to be garnering a lot of negative attention as of late. There seems to be quite an uproar among photographers and people alike with regards to how images are being edited for publication in beauty magazines and advertising.
There seems to be an abundance of very poorly edited images being published in magazines and ads in order to create the illusion of the “perfect body” or flawless beauty. I have personally seen some incredibly poor editing of images which are actually getting published in all forms of media. It makes me wonder; who is proofing and approving this work before it gets published? Are they fucking blind? These mistakes, for lack of a better word, couldn’t be more blatant when you look at the image(s). It’s a completely inaccurate representation of the model and utterly inappropriate.
I saw an article about an ad for Victoria’s Secret the other day and it was painfully obvious that the image had been touched up. Apparently this seems to be an ongoing issue for the lingerie company with their Photoshop happy editors. This cannot be helping their company image. I know Victoria’s Secret is not the only company where this subject has been the topic of discussion and criticism but this bone of contention is becoming more and more prevalent in the “beauty” industry.
Not only does this reflect poorly upon the photography industry but more importantly these retouched images are causing a whole other host of problems among our female youth. These photos are sending the wrong message to the young girls/women who are consuming the content. The message being, “it’s in to be thin”. This is not a healthy message to be sending to our younger generation but I digress as this is a whole other topic for a completely separate blog post.

 

Image courtesy of community.babycenter.com

Headshots - Photographing the Photographer

I don’t know about you or anyone else for that matter but I can tell you with absolute certainty, I cannot stand having my photo taken.
When you think about it, is this really an oddity among photographers? I am not too sure it would be. I would much rather be the one behind the camera pressing the shutter and giving direction. I’d rather not be the subject and take direction.
On the other hand, I would say it’s a necessary evil for photographers to have a great head shot. We are after all trying to sell ourselves and when all is said and done, we are sensory, visual beings. It would be nice for the people hiring us to be able to see who they’re hiring instead of some faceless photographer.
Don’t get me wrong, I do have a head shot on my website. It’s a very dramatically lit, artistic photograph. I like it very much however is it appropriate for me to promote my services with this type of photograph? Probably not! I do realize I need to update it sooner rather than later. I have agonized over this realization for some time now but have decided it’s time I man up or bite the proverbial bullet and just get it done and over with.
I will be attending a photography workshop next month and it just so happens there are a couple of photographers offering a “photograph the photographer” photo session and I have signed up for it. So look out for a new head shot of me sometime later next month.

Photographers - Stop Obsessing and Get Out There and Shoot

As the saying goes…. There is more than one way to skin a cat, meaning there are several possible ways of doing something.

Now I am going to go out on a limb here and say this saying applies to learning. Everybody learns or absorbs information in different ways. I personally learn through reading, listening and making very detailed notes which I can refer back to later when putting it into practice. I have found over time this is the best method for me to learn how to do something.

I think I can safely speak for the majority of people or at least a large number of people when I say the best way to learn is through good old fashioned hands on training or experience. So when it comes to photography, yes you do have to learn the technical aspects of the craft and your tool which can be done by reading or classes to get a general understanding but if you don’t put it into practice, you aren’t going to fully learn it. Don’t get caught up too much in the technical particulars of photography. You have to get out there and just shoot.

Sitting on your ass and reading about or watching training videos and attending photography seminars is all well and good but nothing beats getting out there with camera in hand and playing around with the camera, experimenting, putting the things you have learned into practice. It’s all meaningless if you aren’t doing something with your new found knowledge.

The more you shoot and experiment, the better the photographer you will become. Stop obsessing over the technical and the training videos and get out there and SHOOT!

Am I a Professional - How Do I Know?

That’s a valid question to ask I would say. How does a photographer/artist know when they have reached “professional” status? I am sure all of us have pondered this question at some point or another in our illustrious careers as artists, whether it was when we were first starting out or a few years into it.
What types of things determine whether an artist is an amateur or a professional? This is a battle I am struggling with, in my own head. I am not a full time photographer but does that mean I cannot be considered a professional because of my current situation? My “situation” being I work at a full time job at the moment and am continually honing my craft on the side. I do have a photography business which I am running in addition to my full time job as an audio visual technician.
I currently show my work in local art shows, I have a web site, I have had paying photography jobs not to mention sold quite a few of my photographs to people. Does selling your work make you a professional? I am often curious as to what, how or even who for that matter, dictates a photographer a pro or an amateur?
I am going to go out on a limb here and say that all of the aforementioned criteria are contributing factors as well as (and I think this is a big one) having a “professional” attitude and knowing how to deal with and handle your clients.
This is just my two cents on the topic. A topic I find a very interesting. I wanted to stir up a bit of conversation on the topic and I would love to hear from you on the matter. What do you think makes someone a professional? Care to give me your “two cents”?

Photographers - Making Pictures vs Taking Pictures

Is there a difference between “taking” a picture and “making” a picture? I have heard this debate/discussion a fair bit lately and I find it quite an interesting topic. I would have to say without a doubt, there is a difference. Those two little words are also what distinguishes a photographer from someone who happens to own a camera, a machine operator.
Taking a picture is essentially a snapshot whereas making a picture requires forethought and planning. You have to envision the photograph, think it out, plan. It captures emotion, it makes someone feel something, elicits emotion as they look at the image. The photograph tells a story!
When I first started out in photography back in high school and even into my late twenties, I can see I was only “taking” photographs. When I look back on my work, as I sometimes tend to do, I just want to see how much progress with my style has been made and how much I have improved. I can clearly see a progression or evolution and am not ashamed to admit it. We all have to start out somewhere. Not many people jump right into making photographs, it takes practice and hard work to get to that point.
Look at other photographers work, admire, study it, see what they are doing differently than others. This will help on your photographic journey to “making” photographs. With practice you will begin to develop your own style. Shoot what you love, things you are passionate about. If you are passionate about something you are photographing, it will definitely show up in your images. This will go a long way in helping you with the journey and to define your style.

Photography - The Importance of Portraiture

Photography isn’t something as simple as pushing a button and capturing a moment. I mean yes, that is the mechanics of it but there is so much more to it than simply pushing a button. Photography tells a story that we may not always be able to put into words. The photographs “speak” and allow us to leave a legacy.
Portrait photography is important and what we do as photographers IS definitely important. With a camera, we can bring out self-awareness. It gives us an opportunity to show people a beauty which they may have never seen or noticed before. Taking someone’s portrait can really help boost their self-confidence by showing them their beauty and truly making them feel beautiful!
The ability to do something like this can be life altering and that my friends, is something incredible. To be able to do that for a person makes you feel euphoric as a photographer. The over-all experience we provide for our clients in a photo session is just as important as the images we make for them.
Our job as portrait photographers is to take THE most beautiful image of you that you have ever seen and give you something to look back upon, something tangible that you will always have.
How many people can say in their job they get the opportunity to alter someone’s attitude or view of themselves, to make someone feel something they have never felt before?
When you put all this into perspective, it’s easy to see why photographs are so vital! Not only to document what is happening or transpiring but also to show people the real beauty that exists within all of us but somehow not always able to see. Nothing can be more rewarding that to help someone see themselves in the way that makes them feel proud and that is beautiful to me.

Photography, Photographers - Misconceptions

The other day at work I was having a conversation with a colleague of mine about work in general and also about our interests outside of work. This person spoke of their interests and then began to ask me about mine.

I piped in about my love for photography, how I have a side business on the go right now and am trying to grow it. I spoke of how long I have been interested in photography and how it all came about. The next thing out of her mouth was “Oh, I wish I knew you were a photographer when I got married last year, I would have hired you, would have liked to give you the work.

I was flattered by the sentiment of the statement. It was a very nice thing to say! Now don’t get me wrong, I appreciate everything about what she said. Although, the first thing that struck me as odd about this was, she had never ever seen my work before. Secondly, she didn’t even know if I am a wedding shooter or bother to ask. I just found all of this humorous in a way because it would seem to me that people assume because someone says they are a photographer, they are good and every photographer must shoot weddings. This, in my opinion is a huge misconception and frankly stereotyping an entire profession.

Not everyone shoots weddings, nor should just anyone shoot weddings. Most photographers have their niche area which they enjoy and work in. People should really take the time to talk to photographers and find out what area of expertise they focus on before making assumptions.

Image courtesy of jillantreeblog.com