photographer

Better Gear DOES NOT Make You A Better Photographer

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…never have truer words been spoken. This has been a constant debate and topic of discussion among photographers in forums and the like for years upon years. It’s a pointless argument/discussion because it’s neither the camera nor the lens that make the picture, it’s the photographer!

Over the years, I have often heard from many people: “oh I need to buy this expensive camera”, “that expensive lens” or “I can’t create the images I want to because I only have this shitty camera or this crappy lens”.  STOP with the excuses!  Nothing could be further from the truth. You absolutely DO NOT need expensive gear to create amazing images.

I wish I had the money to buy all the gear I wanted but I don’t and I don’t feel that is truly going to help me create better work. I suggest you start out with a relatively inexpensive camera and the kit lens that comes with it. Get to know the ins and outs of your camera.  Practice, practice and more practice with what you have. Master your camera.  Learn it inside out.

You can worry about better gear and spending more money later on once you have worked on and honed your craft.  Learn the basic principles of photography and master the camera you have.  So many people get caught up in spending a ton of money on gear when they are just starting out it and it really isn’t going to make you a better photographer nor is it necessary.

Only YOU have the ability to make YOU a better photographer. So get out there practice, learn and talk to other photographers who have been at this awhile. Take courses, get a mentor but MOST importantly get out there and shoot!

Looking Back on 2017... A Year in Review

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If I were to look back on the year 2017, both professionally and personally, I would have to say that overall it was a pretty fuckin’ EPIC year!

I got to see my oldest daughter graduate from high school and starting the next chapter in her life. Undoubtedly, one of the proudest moments for me as a father and I must say ranks right up there as the best of my 2017.

The year started out with me working full time at Ernst & Young but had long entertained the idea of moving on to pursue my photography business full time but at the beginning of the year, it became more of a serious consideration. I was growing tired of the corporate life.  My heart and mind just weren’t in it anymore and I knew it was time to move on.  Midway through the year, with the support of my wife, my kids, my family and friends, I finally decided it was time to jump ship.  To my surprise, I ACTUALLY did it!  I forced myself to step outside my comfort zone.   This is NOT something I do!   This was scary as all hell!  Leave the security of the 9-5?  NOT ME! The best part about it: I am still here to talk about it!  I didn't break and I didn't die from it!

I had my biggest year in business selling 6 pieces of my artwork to Ernst & Young.  My work to hang on the walls of their brand new building. Being able to have something I created hang on the walls of a Big 4 Accounting firm was quite an incredible feeling.  As I had worked there for many years being able to leave a legacy, my legacy was just an indescribable feeling.

Another great moment for me, being featured in my friend Skip Cohen’s blog post. For those of you who have no idea who Skip is: he is first and foremost an incredible human being but he is also an amazing educator, speaker and writer who is very well known in the photography industry and I am proud to call him a friend.

Three of my boudoir images were selected to be in a magazine, which for me was an incredible accomplishment since I am new to the boudoir genre. That was definitely a highlight of my year, I am very proud.

I was awarded the Standing Ovation Award 2017 from my peers and fellow photographers in my AIBP group. The AIBP organization is the Association of International Boudoir Photographers. They are an amazingly talented group of photographers and an amazing community of people.  To say I am honoured and over the moon excited is a gross understatement. Words cannot express my gratitude for this award.

Overall, I accomplished quite a bit in 2017 and am very proud of what I managed to do. I know there is a ton more work to do as an entrepreneur.   There are many more challenges to overcome but I am so looking forward to taking on 2018! It’s going to be a kick ass year, I can just feel it!

I borrowed the following from a fellow photographer/friend of mine but this is how I am going to look at 2018:

Be A Fucking Wolf.
Be A Fucking Lion.
Take No Shit.
Set Goals.
Smash Them!
Eat People's Faces Off.
Be A Better Person.
Show People Who The Fuck You Are.
Never Apologize For Being Awesome.
Stay The Mother Fucking Course.

In this coming year I urge all of you to do at least 1 thing that forces you outside your comfort zone.  Trust me, you won't regret it. You only live once, what do you have to lose?  Challenges and roller coaster rides as an entrepreneur and business owner…I say BRING IT ON! I am here and I am ready for ALL of it!!!

Put Your Money Where Your Mouth is... In Front of the Camera

 

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I can honestly say I really don’t like having my picture taken and I am sure there are quite a few photographers out there who would agree with this sentiment. I know it sounds strange, a photographer who doesn’t like being on the other side of the camera?!

For me, I am most comfortable BEHIIND the camera; I don’t like that feeling of feeling vulnerable and awkward. I don’t know how to pose or genuinely smile without having it come off looking fake.

I have been thinking about this quite a bit lately and the more I think about it, the more I see clearly that it’s quite hypocritical of me as a photographer to take that stance on getting in front of the camera. How can I possibly expect my clients to relax and feel comfortable in front of the camera if I don’t do it myself? A practice what you preach moment, if you will. 

Perhaps it’s even a little bit more hypocritical for me being a boudoir photographer.  I have women who are complete strangers, wearing very little clothing getting in front of my camera. I pose and light them for photographs.  I talk them through the photo session. I try to help them feel relaxed and forget they are in front of a camera to make it a little less of an intimidating experience.

Now more than ever I think we male photographers need to step into our clients shoes and get in FRONT of the camera.  Maybe have a female photographer shoot us in a “dudoir” session.  You know, put my money where my mouth is!  I have noticed a trend online over the past while that more men are doing exactly that and I think it’s amazing. It doesn’t have to be cheesy just because I am a male.  It can be done very tastefully. All the images I have seen from male boudoir (dudoir) shoots were very well done.

We need to do this in order to feel and understand the vulnerability and nervousness our clients feel when they step in front of our cameras so we can HONESTLY relate and genuinely say we know how they feel.

I am challenging all my male counterparts in the industry to do exactly this! Including me! I am looking for a female photographer that is up for the task of photographing this mug of mine!  Any takers????

The Importance of Using a Make Up Artist on a Photo Shoot

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I would like to preface this post by telling you this one was guest written by my amazing and incredibly talented make up artist Maddy McGhee aka "madeupbymads" Please show her some love and check out her work and talent by clicking on the hyperlinks below.

"The worst part about having my makeup done by some else is walking away and never looking like myself. However getting your makeup done to highlight your natural beauty can be an eye opening, wonderful experience! Between work/school/kids it's hard to always get in the time for yourself let alone your makeup - that's why sometimes doing something like a boudoir shoot where it's all about you is super fun! Makeup doesn't have to take over the shoot but just makes you shine and adds to the day. You don't wear makeup or a lot of makeup on a regular basis? No problem! I'm a big believer in using makeup to enhance the beauty that's there rather than covering so each application is light and natural but still adding that special something something! It can be an intimidating experience but also an empowering one and that's how I feel about makeup! You just have to find what is right for you and your look. The polished look finished off with a professional photographer can make moments last forever (ones that you don't want to crop yourself out of...) Can't wait to work with you! Maddy from @madeupbymads Check out more of my work on Instagram/YouTube/Facebook @madeupbymads "

Competition - YOU Are Your Only Competition

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You know, it always makes me laugh when I talk to people about being a full time photographer. The common response is: “ohhhh it’s so tough out there. There are so many photographers out there, so much competition”.

That same argument about competition could be used with musicians, artists, hockey players, hell just about anything really! Could you imagine if everyone followed and believed in that logic? It’s a pretty bleak way to look at things in my opinion.

Firstly, I am NOT in competition with anybody other than MYSELF.  Secondly, there is more than enough work to go around for all of the photographers out there. Thirdly, and I believe this to be one of the most important things, you MUST set yourself apart from all the other photographers out there, PLAIN and SIMPLE. This will help you attract clients.  Whether it’s through your style or your customer service, you should use everything at your disposal to your advantage.  There is only one YOU!

You should only be competing with yourself! This way, you are constantly pushing yourself to improve, to be better at whatever it is you are doing. So don’t listen to the noise in your ears, ignore it and do your thing! Don’t worry about what everyone else is doing, that’s a waste of time!!  Focus on being the BEST YOU!

The Boudoir Experience

The Experience

“A smile is the most beautiful curve on a woman’s body”

boudoir (/ˈbuːd.wɑːr/; French: [bu.dwaʁ]) is defined as a woman's private sitting room or salon in a furnished accommodation usually between the dining room and the bedroom, but can also refer to a woman's private bedroom. The word itself, by its very definition says this is all about a woman, all about YOU!  

Today boudoir photography is one of the fastest growing genres of photography and this is NOT just a photo shoot.  It’s an experience and one like no other.  Yes, it may take you out of your comfort zone but you will feel like a queen for a couple of hours while in front of my camera. 

I am a professional and provide a professional service for you! I will never share or publish ANY of your images without your written permission.  As a male photographer, I also feel like I can provide a different perspective.  I love shooting boudoir photography and I feel it really comes through in my work.  

Not only am I a male photographer but I am also a husband, a father and a friend to many women and I hear the same things all too often:  “I’m not that good looking”, “I’m ugly”, “I’m too fat for boudoir” and so on.  But I want to be able to show you what I see!  I love the female form, hey let’s face it I am a man!!!  More importantly, I want you to see what I see because ALL women are beautiful.  No matter the shape or size, ALL women are beautiful and I want you to see what I see!  I will take the most beautiful photographs you have ever seen of yourself!  There is nothing more rewarding for me than seeing the excitement in your eyes and the joy in your expression when you see the finished product

Let me give you a little bit of a rundown on how I like to run one of my shoots.

There are 4 steps to my process.  First we start out with a pre-shoot consult.  This is where we have a little introductory session so we can discuss what kind of shoot you want.  We talk about your ideas/thoughts and desires for your shoot.  Do you feel comfortable with a sexy lingerie look? A casual sexy look?  Whatever your heart desires.  Basically, I want your input too!  This is about you after all, I am merely there to help you realize it! Your session will be unique and tailored to you so there is no worry about it looking the same as someone else’s. Just like a woman’s beauty is unique, your shoot will be as well.

Second, we book a date that works for you.  I want to work with you, to find the best time for you in your schedule so you are relaxed and ready to be gorgeous!

Third, the actual boudoir shoot!  When you arrive for your session, you will be greeted by me and handed a beverage. You will then be whisked off to “the chair” where you will be pampered by our hair and makeup artist.  You just sit and enjoy as we chat and you get beautified. You will get 2-3 outfit changes during your session.  I will guide and coach you throughout the entirety of your shoot.  Your job is to be beautiful!

And the fourth and final step is the moment of truth: the photo shoot reveal!  We will set some time aside to meet so we can look at your photos together!

I believe that a boudoir shoot is something every woman should experience at the very least, once in their lifetime.  This experience is all about YOU.   A boudoir shoot isn’t specific to a “type” of woman, it IS for EVERY woman!  I am hoping this experience will “transform” you.

We will celebrate your confidence, your femininity, your elegance, your sensuality and most importantly you will be empowered!  This is all about a body positive experience.

“The most beautiful thing a woman can wear is confidence”

Live Life According To You - Think Outside The Box

I had a very interesting conversation with a family member over the Christmas holidays. He is older than me and currently retired.  Our conversation started about jobs, pensions, vacation time and medical benefits, things like that. I was telling him about all the wonderful things I get from my employer for my years of service and he in turn told me about all his.  I already knew about most of it because he is family and I was familiar with the company he had worked with and what they offered to their employees.

I told him all about my job and the things that annoy me about it. He proceeded to tell me that I just need to suck it up and deal with it because EVERYBODY hates their job!  It’s just a part of life. He went on to tell me he hated his job and wanted to quit repeatedly over the last 14 years he was employed but stuck with it because of the pension and of course, the money.  Typically his generation stayed at one job for the duration of their working careers but things have changed and will continue to change with the each generation.

I found his statement to be kind of sad.  Giving it even further thought, I felt that it’s even a wee bit close minded.  Just because that was the path you chose doesn’t mean it has to be your destiny. On one hand it’s just human nature we stay with what we know, what’s comfortable but on the other hand so many people stay in something they are not happy doing every day for a variety of reasons.  Whether that is the money, the benefits, the pension or just the fear of the being without those things I do understand it and why he made that statement.

It really drove some things home for me.  I am thankful for our conversation but why the fuck should ANYBODY stay and be miserable at their jobs if they really don’t have to?  Who says you have to? Fear dictates this to a certain degree but why stay stuck in that box? Why be miserable at something we spend over half our lives doing? We typically spend more of our lives at work then we do with our families at home. This miserable feeling/mood will undoubtedly spill over into multiple areas of our lives, right? Break out of that box people I urge you to do so if you are unhappy. Life is far too short to be unhappy. Don’t stay just because everyone else says it’s the right thing or the responsible thing to do! Follow your heart and do something out of the ordinary.  Think outside the box and helllllz yeah it will be scary and there will be times you will be paralyzed with fear but at the end of the day, aren’t YOU worth it?

Male Boudoir Photographers - It's NOT a Man's World

Now I am fairly new to boudoir photography and when I say new I mean I have done a handful of shoots.  I know there are lots of guys out there who aren’t photographers at all but think wow that is so cool and what a great gig that would be. Believe me I have even heard that from a few friends. You get to photograph half naked women in lingerie, look at sexy women all day and so on. While yes this is true I photograph women in lingerie this is not what it’s all about for me, not at all!

When I am shooting a session I am not even thinking about how sexy the woman is or anything like that because I am too busy focusing on posing her.  I am making sure the lighting works for the shot and ensuring my camera settings are correct in order to make certain I get the shot as close to perfect “in camera” as possible. I really don’t have time to be concerned about the other stuff especially when I am in the zone shooting, interacting with my subject.

I know that some people would balk at that and say I am bullshitting and it must be at least part of the intrigue and interest but it really isn’t. In all honesty for me it is truly about making the women who get in front of my camera feel comfortable in their own skin.  Feel beautiful, help them build their confidence, help them love their bodies.  Ultimately I want them to be happy with the images/art I create for them and if I can do that for EVERY woman that gets in front of my camera then I know I have done my job as a photographer.  I will have helped another person to realize their self-worth and beauty and that my friends is the icing on the proverbial cake!

Yervant and Anie - The Photography Symposium 2016

“All good things must come to an end” and no better way to sum up the second day of Yervant and Anie’s Photography Symposium. This event rolled through Toronto as one of its many stops on June 15th, 16th and 17th.  I attended the event for 2 days and there was a master class on the third day which I opted out of.

It was an incredible experience and one I won’t soon forget. If you do get the chance to attend this event in your city, I strongly advise you do check it out, you won't be disappointed. Yervant and Anie put together an unbelievable program packed with a wealth of information, knowledge and not to mention an incredible line up of 6 industry professionals all experts in their particular area of photography. It took place at The Berkley Field House, a truly beautiful venue. It was geared at a smaller more intimate group of about 60-100 attendees which I feel was the perfect amount.

The two days were jam packed with information and personal stories and at times, astonishingly emotional and honest moments.  Yervant speaking about wedding photography and making us laugh hysterically.  Joe Buissink sharing his incredibly moving story of his childhood and why he is so passionate about wedding photography.  Sue Bryce sharing her brilliance on posing your subjects.  Michele Neal Celentano and her insistence on existing in your photographs because of her beautifully moving story.

There were a couple of common threads that were strung through these two days of presentations and stories. These recurring threads seemed to be:  if you work hard at your craft, you can achieve whatever it is you want for you and your business and you are worth it so charge your clients what you feel you are worth but keep in mind, you must deliver on that promise.

One thing in particular really struck a chord with me, the presenters kept re-iterating was with regards to printing your work.  Then I thought about it and we don’t print our work nearly as often as we should! You MUST print your work.  Preserve those moments in time through print as you never get a second chance to go back and relive those moments.  They are fleeting!

Remember, it’s not a photograph until it’s printed!  This statement really reverberated me and reminded me just how important it is for us photographers to print our work. Not only are you helping yourself but you are also helping to preserve our industry.

The Film Days - Moments Coming To Life

Never in a million years did I think this one class I was going to take would change my life.  Wait, not only my life but change the way I saw things and open my eyes up to a totally different world!

It was grade 10 photography class at Victoria Park High School and I remember it like it was yesterday.    I was bitten by the photography bug and have been addicted ever since. My uncle gave me my first film camera, a Konica Minolta and I loved that thing. Photography for me has always been such an incredibly fun, creative way to communicate MY visions.  Allowing people into my world, to view things through my lens, my eyes.

Walking into that darkroom for the first time, the darkness, the red light and of course that unforgettable smell of developer, stop bath and fixer all mixed in together. Overwhelming at first but you get used to it and learn to like the distinctive smell that fills the darkroom.  One of the toughest parts was fumbling around in the dark, no pun intended.  Then getting the film out of the camera and onto the spool and into the developing tank. Once I got the hang of that, it was smooth sailing and good times all around.

It was a bit of a steep learning curve both with the camera and in the darkroom but I enjoyed every minute of it and I think I am a better photographer for it. Having learned the craft before the digital revolution exploded on the scene has made me a better photographer.  I see things differently, I shoot differently and I actually think about the shot before I take it.

Making test strips to get the right exposure for your image, dodging and burning the real way, not in a digital computer program. Then, the piece de resistance, seeing what you shot in camera literally come to life on that piece of photography paper right before your very eyes.  That my friends is magic! The whole darkroom process is just an incredible experience from start to finish. I am so glad I was able to experience that for a few years in high school.  Sometimes I really do miss and long for those days.

Workshops - Learning, Sharing, Shooting

When considering whether or not to attend a workshop, a lot of factors contribute to the ultimate decision of attending. They are a great way to expand your network as there will undoubtedly be other like-minded people to speak with, to share knowledge with and of course the obvious, to learn! Do I? or Don’t I? Of course the first one is cost followed by content followed by a series of questions: How will it benefit me? How long is the workshop? and who is giving the workshop?
When the Peter Hurley “Illuminating the Face” workshop was announced for Toronto, well that was a no brainer! I knew I had to attend as I had been waiting some time for this one to come to town. It took place back in March and this was an incredible opportunity to learn from the best in the industry. How could I possibly pass that up!? I figured I wasn’t going to get many chances to actually get to interact, to learn from him. I had to take advantage of being up close and personal with the one and only Peter Hurley. I found the cost to be incredibly reasonable. The location was right here in Toronto, so getting there was easy. The time commitment was only an 8 hour day. This was without a doubt something I had to do.
The workshop was put on by Henry’s Camera and they did an incredible job. I would like to say a huge thanks to them for putting this on. The workshop was also sponsored by Profoto and I have to say their gear is absolutely incredible, so easy to use and easy to work with. Their reps were so friendly and helpful.
It was an absolutely incredible day all around. It was a full, jam packed eight hour day where I got to learn from the master of headshots. I got to meet a ton of great people. Perhaps some of the nicest people I have ever met. Peter Hurley was such an incredible teacher. So easy to talk to, down to earth and just an all-around incredibly nice guy. It was such an invaluable experience I will never forget.

Is Photography Real Anymore?

When we look at something or a scene, our eyes interpret and tell the brain what we are seeing is real…or is it? When it comes to photography, has the advancement of technology over the years done something to possibly alter this perception?
Let’s be honest, it’s next to impossible to determine the authenticity of a photograph in terms of whether or not it is a composite of multiple images. With the level of skill some people possess in Photoshop, it’s incredibly difficult to establish what’s genuine and what’s not.
How far can a photographer take an image and alter it before it is no longer considered a photograph in the true sense of the word? What is acceptable? Is there such a thing as taking a photograph past a certain point in terms of editing before it is no longer a true photograph? Who, if anyone is the person to determine such a thing?
I know there are photography contests or competitions that will not accept images that have been manipulated or composited but what is considered taking it past the point of a “true” photograph? Is using filters, pre-sets and textures in Lightroom or Photoshop or even dodging and burning in these editing software programs considered acceptable?
Think back to the photography of the great Ansel Adams, he used the dodge and burn method in the darkroom when he was shooting, as did many great photographers that came after him. Hell, even when I first started out in photography, I was shooting film and used the dodge and burn method when developing my photographs in the darkroom.
Surely these methods of editing cannot be considered altering an image to an unacceptable form of photography but everyone has their opinion as to what they consider a photograph. Each photographer is undoubtedly going to interpret a scene differently than the next. Just because mine may be completely different from yours doesn’t make it any less of a “photograph” than yours.

 

Image courtesy of huffingtonpost.com

Headshots - Photographing the Photographer

I don’t know about you or anyone else for that matter but I can tell you with absolute certainty, I cannot stand having my photo taken.
When you think about it, is this really an oddity among photographers? I am not too sure it would be. I would much rather be the one behind the camera pressing the shutter and giving direction. I’d rather not be the subject and take direction.
On the other hand, I would say it’s a necessary evil for photographers to have a great head shot. We are after all trying to sell ourselves and when all is said and done, we are sensory, visual beings. It would be nice for the people hiring us to be able to see who they’re hiring instead of some faceless photographer.
Don’t get me wrong, I do have a head shot on my website. It’s a very dramatically lit, artistic photograph. I like it very much however is it appropriate for me to promote my services with this type of photograph? Probably not! I do realize I need to update it sooner rather than later. I have agonized over this realization for some time now but have decided it’s time I man up or bite the proverbial bullet and just get it done and over with.
I will be attending a photography workshop next month and it just so happens there are a couple of photographers offering a “photograph the photographer” photo session and I have signed up for it. So look out for a new head shot of me sometime later next month.

Am I a Professional - How Do I Know?

That’s a valid question to ask I would say. How does a photographer/artist know when they have reached “professional” status? I am sure all of us have pondered this question at some point or another in our illustrious careers as artists, whether it was when we were first starting out or a few years into it.
What types of things determine whether an artist is an amateur or a professional? This is a battle I am struggling with, in my own head. I am not a full time photographer but does that mean I cannot be considered a professional because of my current situation? My “situation” being I work at a full time job at the moment and am continually honing my craft on the side. I do have a photography business which I am running in addition to my full time job as an audio visual technician.
I currently show my work in local art shows, I have a web site, I have had paying photography jobs not to mention sold quite a few of my photographs to people. Does selling your work make you a professional? I am often curious as to what, how or even who for that matter, dictates a photographer a pro or an amateur?
I am going to go out on a limb here and say that all of the aforementioned criteria are contributing factors as well as (and I think this is a big one) having a “professional” attitude and knowing how to deal with and handle your clients.
This is just my two cents on the topic. A topic I find a very interesting. I wanted to stir up a bit of conversation on the topic and I would love to hear from you on the matter. What do you think makes someone a professional? Care to give me your “two cents”?

Everyone Is a Photographer - Is Access To Technology Helping or Hurting The Photography Industry?

In today’s day and age, where technology is so easily attainable for anyone and everyone, all of a sudden everybody is a photographer. This is constantly a hot topic of discussion on the internet and it periodically reappears and rears its ugly head. I have heard and read rants from other photographers in the industry about the fact that anyone with a camera fancies themselves a photographer. Even I have been guilty of venting about this very topic.

Digital Single-Lens Reflex or DSLR cameras have come down in price so much in the past 5-10 years that it has made it affordable for everybody from your Grandmother to your Aunt Josephine to Uncle Sam, to go out and purchase a camera and start taking pictures.

The cell phone camera has just exploded onto the scene now as well. We have people releasing books that consist entirely of iPhone photography. Albeit the people releasing the books like that are in fact professional photographers, it is another tool with which people capture images.

I think it’s a great thing that technology has become so affordable in the photography world and more people are jumping on the proverbial photography bandwagon. Although just because someone picks up a DSLR or an iPhone or a compact camera this doesn’t make them a photographer. It takes practice, hard work and frankly you just have to have an eye for it. Can someone develop an eye for “making” a photograph? Personally, I don’t think having an eye for capturing images can be taught to someone. It is innate and you either have it or you just don’t.

Having said my piece, I would like to leave you with a couple questions to ponder: Is the affordability and ease of accessibility to photographic technology helping or hurting the photography industry? Let’s be honest, are we really concerned about the Uncle Joe’s or others that go out and buy a DSLR just because they can, encroaching on our business and stealing work away from us? I think not but what do you think?

Image courtesy of lolroflmao.com

Is Photography Art? Should Photographers Be Considered Artists?

I have heard a lot of chatter and read a few articles relating to this subject as of late on the internet. It does pose an interesting question for sure but I think the answer is really, well, subjective as is art. Think about it, what you and I may consider or deem to be art, the next person looking at the exact same thing may feel and/or think it isn’t art at all.
Firstly, I have heard a lot of people say that photography isn’t art. How is that possible? A photograph is what that person is seeing with their eye, through their viewfinder. It is their interpretation at that precise moment. Is that not considered art? Secondly, if what a photographer does is considered art, then by all accounts a photographer should be called an artist! Do these people or photographers really even give a shit if their work is called art or if they are considered to be artists?
Art by definition is the expression or application of human creative skill and imagination, typically in a visual form such as painting or sculpture, producing works to be appreciated primarily for their beauty or emotional power.
I guess what I am trying to say is, if it feels good or feels right to create something, to express your creative skill and imagination then just keep on doing it. Don’t fall into the trap of worrying about whatever it is you do being labelled art or being put into the box of being called an artist. Just enjoy the process of creating and be proud of your work. First and foremost create for you.
Happy Creating folks and just keep on doing what you love to do!

A Different Perspective - Through The Eyes of a Photographer

The other day I had uploaded some images onto a photo site where people vote on them and you can win awards for your images based on this voting system they have in place. I had received a notification from the site telling me I had acquired a new follower. I looked into who it was and it just so happened to be a very good friend of mine who ISN’T a photographer. I was quite surprised at this and at the same time incredibly curious as to why he had joined the site to begin with.

I reached out to him later that same day and asked him. He stated in a very matter of fact way, he was curious to see the world through the photographer’s eyes. He continued to explain to me, he loves the way photographers see the world, it’s so different from everybody else and incredibly fascinating. He proceeded to tell me how photographers have the ability to capture a particular moment in time which can NEVER be captured again in the same fashion and preserve that moment. This fact both intrigued and captivated him.

What he said really got me thinking because I have never really thought about it however we as photographers see the world in a completely different light and it that statement couldn’t be more truthful. We see the world through the eye of our camera, our camera lens. This is a very unique way to view things and give people an alternate view or different perspective on an otherwise everyday subject.

It was a very interesting conversation which made me pause and think about the impact of what we see, show to the world and the affect that it has on people.

Image courtesy of ttgphoto.com